Tropical Style

Easy Decorating: Turn Over a New, Tropical Leaf

A vase of tropical leaves might be the perfect answer if you crave some easy-care green. These leaves may last for weeks and come in many different shapes and fashions. Palm fronds are breezy and beachy, and they grow in a range of sizes, from small enough for an average-size vase into large and quite heavy — in which case you are going to need a huge floor urn. Large tropical leaves like strelitzia, elephant’s ear and split-leaf philodendron are reminiscent of a tropical rain forest and are able to appear exotic and spectacular. Just imagine your perfect tropical getaway and select your leaves so. More ways to develop tropical fashion Rachel Reider Interiors Vases filled with strelitzia and philodendron leaves are the ideal accessory to this tropical-style porch in Boston. The colorful throw pillows and green leaves attract the room to life. Tracy Murdock Allied ASID Isn’t it really…

Tropical Style

Great Design Plant: Pride of Madeira

To explain Pride of Madeira’s attributes as anything other than stunning doesn’t do the plant justice. You’ve probably heard that the list of features prior to — purple flower spikes, mounding habit, low water usage, coastal tolerant, sage green foliage — but once you’ve seen a Pride of Madeira and its charms, you’ll never forget it. Such as the island it evolves from, Pride of Madeira allures from both near and far. GARDENIA-Sharly & Tanya Illuz Botanical name: Echium candicans (syn. Echium fastuosum)Common name: Pride of MadeiraUSDA zones: 9 to 10; hardy to about 25 degrees Fahrenheit (find your zone)Water necessity: Small to nonemoderate requirement: Total sunMature dimension: 5 to 6 feet tall and 6 to 10 feet wideBenefits and tolerances: Flowers attract bees, birds and butterflies; deer resistant; coastal and drought tolerantSeasonal interest: Evergreen; blossoms spring through summerWhen to plant: Plant seeds in spring; plant cuttings in midsummer. Caution:…

Tropical Style

What Potted Plant Has a Large Bell-Like Flower & Large Green Fuzzy Leaves?

A potted plant with large bell-like flowers and large, fuzzy green leaves will be probably a flowering maple, sometimes known as a parlor maple (Abutilon x hybrida). Hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 and 10, abutilons are broadleaf evergreens often grown as houseplants. Regardless of the common name, abutilons aren’t true maples, but members of the mallow (Malvaceae) plant family. Flower colors range from white through shades of yellow, orange, pink and red. Abutilon Description When grown in containers, hybrid abutilons develop 2 to 4 feet tall and equally wide. Grown in-ground inside their hardiness zone, they are much larger, growing 8 to 10 feet tall. The bell-like flowers have five petals apiece, using a central staminal column, much like that of its relative, the hollyhock (Alcea rosea), hardy in USDA zones 2 through 10. The plants also feature large, lobed maple-like leaves which are covered…

Tropical Style

Excellent Design Plants: Stars of the Succulent Garden

Each succulent stands out in its own way — that the variegated foliage of Aeonium, the elegance and size of agave, the cold-hardiness and durability of Sempervivum. Out-of-this-world color and yearlong attractiveness belong toEcheveria. Hailing in semidesert areas of Mexico and of Central and South America, Echeveria thrives in the mild climates of California and the American Southwest. Its vibrant, glaucous foliage and year-after-year flowering makes it among the most common succulent types. Cold sensitivity might be a concern for many gardeners, but handily enough, Echeveria creates a excellent container plant. After fall rolls in, just pack up and bring it indoors. Welcome your containers back. Gardens from Gabriel, Inc.. Botanical name: Echeveria sppCommon names: Echeveria, hens-and-chicksWhere it will grow: Hardy to approximately 32 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on species (USDA zones 9 to 11; locate your zone)Water requirement: Looks best with moderate watermoderate requirement: Full sun, but shelter it from…

Tropical Style

Southwest Gardener's November Checklist

Comparing the American Southwest to colder, wetter regions in November is an intriguing study. While much of the nation is bundling around endure months of winter, the Southwest is embracing this welcome heating to enjoy outdoor living. No matter if you are still wearing shorts or now putting on a sweater, it is time to enjoy and refine our gardens! The dry Southwest has been divided into three zones of overall and extreme temperatures:Low zone: The hottest areas with no winter; includes Phoenix, Arizona; Palm Springs, California; Laughlin, Nevada; and Yuma, Arizona (USDA zones 9 to 10) Middle zone: Hot with Minimal winter; includes Tucson, Arizona; warm Regions of Las Vegas, Nevada; Barstow, California; and Lajitas, Texas (USDA zones 8 to 9a)High zone: Moderately hot using brief, definite winters; includes El Paso, Texas; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Payson, Arizona; Bishop, California; and Saint George, Utah (USDA zones 6b to 8a) Waterwise…

Tropical Style

Great Design Plant: Lavender Cotton

Intense summer sunshine can render plants scorched and depleted by late night, making for a tired-looking garden when the mercury settles down and we can get out to appreciate the outdoors. For lavender cotton (Santolina chamaecyparissus), it’s the opposite. Bring on sunlight, because this plant can take the heat. WBLA_Corky Botanical name: Santolina chamaecyparissusCommon name: ‘Lavender cotton’USDA zones: 6 to 9(find your zone)Water necessity: routine water to establish root system; intermittent once recognized Light requirement: Entire sunMature size: 2 feet tall, 3 feet wideBenefits and tolerances: Tolerant of deer, drought, heat, wind and coastal states; firewise plantingSeasonal curiosity: Flowers in mid to late summer; evergreenWhen to plant: Plant seedlings in early summer; split in spring or autumn WBLA_Corky Distinguishing attributes. Santolina is a sun lover, also its look conjures everything bright — by the bleached gray foliage to its sunny yellow button flowers. It is a densely clumping and mounding…

Tropical Style

Pick the Ideal Front Walkway Material

If it comes to placing a home aside, few things are as crucial as curb appeal. That all-important walkway to your front door is likely the very first thing that guests see, so making a great first impression is crucial. Brick, slate, gravel and bluestone are only a few of the superb go-to alternatives for creating a walkway with pizzazz. Here are a few things to think about when choosing a material that matches your home’s exterior. Environmental Landscape Associates A long, straight path instantly leaves your house the focal point, adding a feeling of grandeur. Brick and slate are both great options for complementing a white exterior, and also the 2 materials pair nicely together. Verdance Landscape Design Slate is a exceptional walkway substance because it doesn’t absorb water, isn’t influenced by direct sunlight and will stand up to extreme weather conditions. The subtle color palette coordinates nicely with…