Home Cleaning

How to Clean Shower Doors With a Spray Bottle of White Vinegar

While vinegar is a staple in the kitchen cabinet, it also is useful for cleaning shower doors. Water stains and soap scum turn a once-clean shower door into a spotted litter. Regular white vinegar in a spray bottle followed by a wipe-down with a moist sponge cleans scummy places without harsh chemicals. Squirt Solution While pure vinegar may be used to clean a shower door, the scent momentarily may be a bit strong as you spray it. For a more diluted solution, pour equal parts vinegar and water into a spray bottle, then shake to blend. Squirt the spray and meticulously cover both sides of the shower door, letting it sit for 20 to 30 minutes. Wipe the doors down with a moist, clean sponge then. Soak and Scrub For scum that’s really hard to eliminate from the door, original squirt the doors with straight vinegar and permit the vinegar…

Home Cleaning

Marble Etching Repair

Marble, whether it tops a small table or a huge counter, adds grandness and permanence in almost any space. Though hard as some other types of stone, the recrystallized limestone substance called marble is porous and prone to etching. Etching occurs when acidic liquid, such as broth or wine dressing, is allowed to take a seat on marble. The end result is a dull place that lacks the shine of finished marble. At times it leaves a stain, too. Fixing minor etch marks is a do-it-yourself project nearly anyone can undertake. Stain Removal Make a poultice from absorbent powder, such as talc, chalk or laundry whiting, and laundry bleach or everyday hydrogen peroxide. It must have the consistency of toothpaste or cake icing. Spread bleach on the area, then apply the poultice so that it goes beyond the stain. The glue should be around 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick. Spread…

Home Cleaning

The way to Remove Lime Deposits on Plant Leaves

When you’ve got hard water and put it to use for your plants, then eventually you will probably be bothered by lime deposits around the leaf. Dissolved lime, salts and vitamins accumulate when difficult water disappears, leaving the materials supporting as strong deposits. The accumulations are often referred to as limescale, lime deposits or iron deposits. Whatever you call them, the crusty white stuff looks awful on plant leaves. It is possible to get rid of these deposits readily with household vinegar. Dust plant leaves at least once every week. Dust quickly accumulates on plants in the cleanest houses. Dampen a soft cloth or sponge with distilled water or rainwater, which do not contain the vitamins which cause lime deposits. Wipe all leaf surfaces clean. Plants breathe better and maximize using accessible lighting when their leaf is not clogged with particles. Clean plants also look much nicer. Combine 1 tablespoon…

Home Cleaning

How to Kill Moss on a Blacktop

Blacktop has many typical monikers, including asphalt, hot mix asphalt, asphalt concrete, macadam, tarmac and bituminous concrete. The material is usually employed where we need a tough, smooth driving surface. Although blacktop is strong and durable, it is susceptible to moss development in moist shaded areas. Over just an unattractive nuisance, moss gets slimy and slippery when wet and presents a safety problem. It is possible to employ elbow grease and everyday household items to eliminate moss on the blacktop with a pressure washer. Sweep dirt and debris in the blacktop with a stiff broom. Cover neighboring plants using plastic garbage bags to protect them from damage. Combine 1 cup of household bleach with 1 gallon of water in a huge bucket. Stir in 1 cup of liquid dish or laundry detergent. Douse tiny patches of moss using the solution. Apply it generously to bigger areas with a sprayer. Permit…

Home Cleaning

The way to Finish Metal With Hand-Rubbed Oil

Ferrous metals need a finish more than wood does — without one, most quickly combine with oxygen to form rust that deteriorates or discolors them. Traditional smiths finish metal with wax or oil; when choosing oil, a drying oil, such as boiled linseed or tung oil, is a much better choice than raw linseed oil or mineral oil. It’s also a good idea to thin the oil before applying it and to heat the metal to improve penetrability. If you are just searching for a hand-rubbed finish on a non-ferrous metal, you can get one with spray paint or dipping substances. OIl-Finishing Ferrous Metals Prepare the metal by scraping off any previous finish that’s flaking or peeling, using a wire brush and scraper. Ideally, the alloy ought to be bare before you oil it. If the alloy has a preceding coat of lacquer, remove it by rubbing the metal down…