Renting and Tenant Rights

The Practice of Purchasing a House in Foreclosure

A house in foreclosure requires that the mortgage loan be brought current. This is the legal way to bring the foreclosure process. The seller should give permission for your purchaser to buy the property. The purchaser will have to communicate in order with the mortgage creditor to find out details about the loan, such as the loan’s condition, the number of payments past due, the interest because of the balance on your loan. Ideally, the purchaser ought to have the seller sign a written release allowing the purchaser to speak with the creditor about the mortgage loan. Permission to Purchase With consent of the seller, the purchaser should contact the creditor. The purchaser might try to negotiate advantageous terms on the loan. It’s likely that the lender will permit the purchaser to assume the loan. Of course, the purchaser would have to bring the loan current. Or the purchaser might…

Renting and Tenant Rights

Rent to Legal Questions

A person with bad or limited credit history can buy a rent-to-own house without upfront funding. A rent-to-own arrangement allows the seller to function as the landlord and get steady payments while remaining the home’s legal owner. A portion of the buyer’s rent payments goes toward the purchase price of the property for the duration of the rent-to-own arrangement. The purchaser has the right to use a buy option in the arrangement to buy the house while the contract is in effect. Purchase Deal A properly signed and implemented rent-to-own arrangement is legally binding provided that the wording doesn’t violate existing state or federal laws. The rent-to-own contract contains all of the conditions of the arrangement between the seller and the purchaser. The amount of time the contact is successful have to be specified in the record, as well as restrictions imposed by the seller along with the total purchase…

Renting and Tenant Rights

Things to Do When a Tenant Stays Following an Eviction at the House

If you have won an eviction case from a tenant, the law is on your side. After a court has ruled in favor of a landlord in an eviction case, then the tenant is required by law to vacate the property. If your tenant is hanging around after the courts have told them to pack up and move, you possess the legal right to possess them removed from the home. Time Frame Under San Francisco law, tenants have five days to vacate the premise as soon as you have won an eviction and the sheriff’s submitted a”Notice to Vacate” announcement on the doorway of their property. Though you have already won the flooding, the tenant is permitted to remain in the property for all those five days and cannot be made to depart early. Court Filings A tenant can also extend their stay on your property after an eviction by…